Tuesday, March 19, 2013

Re-purposing #2

OUCH!
 Let's get one thing straight...I did not just hack into and chop up a vintage treadle just for the fun of it.  This was not a decision I made lightly. I did do my research, get repair quotes and looked into having it restored. I totally respect the integrity of a vintage anything! I collect vintage! I love my 1932 Singer Featherweight that does work!  I, in no way, encourage anyone to tear apart a working treadle or one that can be repaired and used!!!

Not that I hold any responsibility to any one for my choice, I will state that the inside of the machine itself was so rusted out that you couldn't even PUT IN replacement parts.  Believe me, if I could have gotten this machine up and running I would have because I would have LOVED to learn how to use my grandmother's treadle! To put my hands where hers had been, to have been able to make that connection with her!

And, even though it would never sew again, it held a lot of sentimental value to my family.  So, I thought and thought and decided to do what we did.  I am now able to share a physical piece of my family history with other members of my family.  And these items will continue to be passed down thru the family in a useful way.

The whole purpose of my post was just to show how to use a machine that could not be returned to working condition. How to still save it and it's memories.  That's what the whole post was about---preserving memories the best way I could

Respectfully,

9 comments:

Sinta Renee said...

I liked your post yesterday Shelley! I was going to tell you that my son found an old treadle that had been left outside for years... he is re-purposing it for me right now as a beautiful quilting table. Since the wood was rotten he is using a piece of oak that he milled himself from a tree that fell in his yard... so that is re-purposed as well! I actually have a half dozen drawers that someone was throwing away... I feel like saved them!

heartsease54 said...

I thought your post yesterday was very thoughtful and I could hear the regret coming from your words that there was no way to use this machine to sew with. I think you did the next best thing. Anyone reading your post should have been able to see that if they had looked farther than the pictures. Anyway-your machine-your choice. Nobody had any right to berate you.

Cathi said...

I think it's wonderful that you were able to find a way to make the treadle useable even if not in the way it originally was to be used. What you did was a brilliant way to keep the family memory part of your life.. It was evident from your post yesterday that a lot of thought went into it.

marie said...

You did a great job in saving pieces of the vintage machine for all family memembers to enjoy. You do not have to justify what or why you did it anyone, it was yours to do as you wished.

Jackie said...

Ouch is an understatement! I had no idea people left such judgmental comments. Is everyone an expert that they know all about this without examining the machine? And even if the machine was in good condition, it's yours to do with what you like.

Anonymous said...

I love to read quilt blog posts and comments. Usually they are fun and light hearted. I rarely comment but I can't believe some of the extremely harsh comments regarding the treadle sewing machine. I agree w/Jackie and some of the others. The old saying, "if you don't have something nice to say, don't say anything at all." I thought how you saved the parts and can still use are wonderful. Every time you look at the machine or use the table you will think of your grandmother on a daily basis and that is what is most important. ~Jody R.

Nancy Baron said...

Shelly, Most people who deal with these machines know how to get them working and sewing again. If you are not familiar with restoring old sewing machines it can look like an impossible job but it isnt. You still have the head and if you are anywhere near California I can get it to sew again..guaranteed :) It of course is yours to do with as you please but there is a product called Evaporust sold at Lowes that will dissolve the rust in 15 minutes and is non toxic. It can with some TLC be made to sew again. It is way to expensive to have it done but you can do it yourself. And it really is not difficult. If I can do it you can also.

Janet said...

I think if I was you I would delete all those comments between Dean and anonymous yesterday. Looks pretty much like spamming to me. As for the machine, I like how creative you were with using it. I'm the sort that tends to keep things just because they are old and I can't think of any way to repurpose them...

Sherryl said...

You are wonderful and don't you forget it! I agree with Janet - there's no need to keep those hurtful comments from yesterday. I love what you did with your Grandmother's machine and I feel certain that she would be SO proud of you! But, even if I didn't agree, I don't see the point in being hurtful. Life is short. Be kind. Take care of yourself and your dear husband and know that you are appreciated.
Sherryl